Internet Fraud

Internet Fraud and Web Scams – How to surf the web safely

Use our internet safety tips to protect you and your family from internet scams so that you can make purchases online and surf the web without fear.

The internet today is one of the widest reaching forms of media the world has ever seen. Many people feel safe and anonymous when exchanging emails, chatting on-line, purchasing items and doing research.

All scams that have been done via other mediums over the years can be done even easier because of the anonymity of the internet. The con artists will use the chat rooms to tout their product, send unsolicited emails and build web sites to attract you to them. Try to keep aware of these scams and recognize them for what they are. A little caution will go along way.

internet fraud

Email Scams are a top concern

Unsolicited emails are a top complaint among web users. They are annoying and make it hard to go through your email without accidently deleting a real message. There is one important fact you need to know about these email messages: A lot of them are scams. Email scams work very well. That’s why there is so much spam. If it didn’t work no one would bother sending them.

Some of the more popular email scams are chain letters, bulk email solicitation, credit repair, guaranteed loans, diet scams, vacation giveaways, investment opportunites, online dating scams and cable descrambler kits. These are just a few of the email scams that arrive in mailboxes every day. Responding to unsolicited emails is risky business. Legitimate businesses don’t advertise using this tactic.

Nigerian 419 Scams

In this classic scam someone from another country needs your help. They claim to have an extraordinary amount of money that needs to be transfered to the US. For your trouble, you can keep a hefty percentage of the loot.

To get the money into your account someone needs to be bribed. That’s where you come in. Once you send this advance fee the money will be deposited into your account. At least that’s how it’s supposed to work. In reality, you’ll never see a dime.

Nigerian scams take many forms. The bottom line is that you need to send a little money to get a lot in return. One variation involves an internet lottery you never knew you entered. Another is a bid on your online auction for far more than your item is worth. They’ll pay with a money order that will be for more than the agreed on price. They will quickly realize their mistake and ask you to return the extra funds to them. If you decline the request will trun into demands or threats. They want you to pay quickly because they’ll have paid you with a counterfeit money order or check.

These scams are often easy to spot once you know the tell-tale signs. Remember that time is on your side. If a buyer or seller has to wait a day or two for their payment to clear the bank, too bad. Don’t fall for any sob stories. Don’t give in to threats.

Nigerian Scam Links

Nigerian Email Scams

Nigerian Counterfeit Check Scams

Internet related service scams

You receive an email with a too good to be true offer for internet services such as setting up a web site or designing graphics and logos for your web site or business. This scam can come in the guise of many offers but are usually all internet related. Maybe it is an offer to help you with auction services or ad banners for your web site and more.

You respond to respond to this and pay your fees up front or they will not perform the service. The scam of course is that you will never receive the service you paid for.

Phishing Scams

Phishing is a scam using emails that look like they’re from banks, credit unions or other businesses and ask a computer user for their bank account number, Social Security number or other personal information. The email is only part of the scheme because once you click the link in the email to log into your account you wind up at a website that is an exact duplicate of the one you expected to find. The only exception is that the URL or website address is a little funny although it may look close enough to the real thing to fool you. It’s a relatively simple scam and it works very, very well. People need to be aware of who they are buying from and what they are buying.

Phishing Scam Links

Read more about Phishing Scams and find out what you need to know to keep this scam from damaging your finances or any of your online accounts.

Internet Fraud Links

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9 Responses

  1. Debra Short says:

    got on chat with a friend I thought talked about sweepstakes gave my info to them but it turns out instinct kicked in and I think they hacked my account or hers I worried about the info I gave out NAME BIRTH DATE ADDRESS EMAIL CELL # please respond wo I know what I can and cannot do thank you

    • Steve M says:

      Can somebody say, “identity sold on DarkNet”? You’re pretty screwed in that regard. I suggest placing a Credit Freeze on your credit report with all 3 bureaus – Equifax, TransUnion and the other one that I keep forgetting – and mention your identity info may be at risk. With that information you listed, someone can use an underground service to literally pull your SSN, and then they have the capability of applying for loans/credit under your name. If you freeze your credit, authentication of your identity will be required at ANY time your credit is checked, and you can temporarily unfreeze it whenever you need your credit.

  2. Babatu Larrimore says:

    I was surfing the internet to find companies that pay for surveys you take. Within a couple of days
    i received a email that stated they would pay me in advance (Direct Shoppers) for shopping with instructions to follow. I received a overnight envelope with a check (cashiers) made out to me for $1980.00 dollars with the instructions, deposit immediately and wait for instructions. The check looked real but the paper stock was very thin, also the bank it was drawn on was in Texas. I called the bank,they said they have no record of the check number or amount. I responded to the email saying I deposited the check and I am waiting for instructions, obviously I didn’t. But I really would like to get some help in arresting these scammers. Please Advise.Thanks

  3. Karen Leppig says:

    I was on my computer and all of a sudden it started flashing and saying I had been hacked – it said to call this number 855-666-XXXX. When I called they said they were Microsoft and that I had been hacked and they would fix it for me.
    they went into my computer and showed me that I had a trojan that was making my computer not work and it would cost $499 to fix
    Thankfully I turned off the computer and called my friend who said it was a scam

  4. H Maheshwari says:

    Hello ,
    Please guide me how to report a scam , a person of California , charged me 1500 USD for filing my case of Canadian Immigration.
    But he cheated and there is no response from him , I want to get my money back. I am not US citizen and not living in US. My current location is Malaysia and I am Pakistani citizen.
    Please help me to get my hard earned money back.

  5. Frank Vignola says:

    Where do i forward an email scam? this is a little tricky and some people may fall for this.

  6. Rex says:

    Hi, Please let me know how to go after my client who ask me to do some work for him. He promised to pay $177 as monthly payment as we agreed that this will be a long term business relationship. He told me he’ll give me some bonus but I am not interested in the bonus as I am after the monthly payment after work is done.

    Work is done via posting ads on Craigslist. After work is done, I ask him to pay via Paypal and now, he’s never replied to my queries. I do have his number but I don’t know if it is still active as I am from the Philippines, and he’s a US Citizen and in Pennsylvania area – last information that I got from the net via afreesms.com after I texted him.

    Please help. All I need is what is due to me.

  7. Kay McCann says:

    Scam: You post an ad seeking a caregiver position. In response you may get someone saying they are out of state moving to your area soon. They claim they want to send you an advanced check towards your services or first week of employment with them. They mail you a check over the amount you two agreed on asking you to keep your portion and make payment with the extra money towards another need of theirs or another person. Using reasoning that sounds somewhat legitimate you agree. You go to your bank cash the check and pocket your earnings and use the rest to pay a specified third party. Eventually you are notified the check is no good and you are held accountable for paying the bank back the entire value of the check and any fees applied. The third party are now off scamming someone else with their portion of cash you had delivered them.

  8. Lil says:

    I was scammed out of 1,500.00 from an ad on Craig’s list. Being a first time user I wasn’t aware of the signs to look for. I feel so foolish and angry. I assumed using Amazon cards I was safe, not so. Who do I talk to and what are my chances of recovering my money?

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